November 2012 - Posts

2013 Golden Globe Predictions: Best Supporting Actress

Indiewire will provide regular updates of our predictions for the Golden Globe Award nominations through December 13th, when the nominations are announced. Here's our take on the best supporting actress category, which is not divided into subcategories like the lead acting races. So basically, it's similar to the Oscar race. Though something tells me Maggie Smith and Judi Dench -- far from sure things in the Oscar race for "The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel" and "Skyfall" -- both sneak in here to become double nominees (they are both predicted in the comedy/musical actress category as well).  Though watch out for Nicole Kidman in "The Paperboy" as a potential surprise. The Globes love Nicole Kidman. Either way, though, Anne Hathaway has basically already won this award... Best supporting actress predictions below. Check out all predictions in all the categories here. 1. Anne Hathaway, Les Miserables 2. Sally Field,...
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2013 Golden Globe Predictions: Best Drama Actress

Indiewire will provide regular updates of our predictions for the Golden Globe Award nominations through December 13th, when the nominations are announced. Here's our take on the best motion actress drama category, which basically has all of the potential Oscar nominees in the mix save Jennifer Lawrence (the frontrunner in the comedy/musical race... though a dark horse here too for "The Hunger Games"). Basically, there's 7 primary options in Jessica Chastain (the only true lock), Emmanuelle Riva, Marion Cotillard, Keira Knightley, Naomi Watts, Quvenzhane Wallis and Helen Mirren. Best actress in a drama predictions below. Check out all predictions in all the categories here. 1. Jessica Chastain, Zero Dark Thirty 2. Emmanuelle Riva, Amour 3. Marion Cotillard, Rust and Bone 4. Keira Knightley, Anna Karenina 5. Naomi Watts, The Impossible 6. Quvenzhane Wallis, Beasts of the Southern Wild 7. Helen Mirren, Hitchcock 8. Jennifer...
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'Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell' and a Jason Byrne Sitcom Among BBC Orders for 2013 Series

With only one short month left in the year the BBC is revealing its big plans for the 2013 TV season, announcing an ecclectic assortment of series for the new year -- some of which will surely make their way to networks here not long after their UK bows. At the center of these announcements are the plans for a six-episode adaptation of Susanna Clarke's bestselling 2004 fantasy novel "Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell," which revolves around the reintroduction of magic to England during the Napoleanic Wars. There have been several attempts at adapting the nearly 900-page novel as a film, but perhaps the small screen is the better medium for bringing Clarke's richly ambitious and heavily populated novel to life without butchering it too much for sake of time. The series will be adapted by Peter Harness, who most recently penned the Kenneth Branagh-starring "Wallander," and directed by Toby Haynes ("Doctor Who," "Being Human"). Cuba...
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Vote for Project of the Week! Will It Be 'Months,' 'Sunny,' 'Pines,' or 'Helen'?

Vote below for this week's Project of the Week. The winning filmmaker will receive a digital distribution consultation from SnagFilms and will become a candidate for Project of the Month. That winner will be awarded with a creative consultation from the fine folks at the Tribeca Film Institute! The four projects up for the prize: "Other Months," "When Sunny Gets Blue," "Lost Pines" and "95 Lives: Helen Levitt." Voting will end on Monday December 3, at 11AM Eastern. Which project do you most want to see?
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Movie Lovers We Love: Dennis Doros is Re-Releasing Film History, From 'Killer of Sheep' to 'Portrait of Jason'

For some time now, Milestone Films president Dennis Doros has been interested in bringing back films lost to history that explore the borders between fact and fiction. For him and his company, started by Doros and the woman who would become his wife, Amy Heller, the turning point was Milestone's release of "Killer of Sheep." L.A. Rebellion filmmaker Charles Burnett's naturalistic film was well-respected and in need of a proper release a few years ago. "It was an impossible challenge for myself," says Doros. "It was very difficult to clear the music rights, and after six years and $150,000 we got those cleared. We spent a total of $450,000 on the restoration. Burnett was a well-respected director but wasn't commercial. The film grossed $660,000." Noting the company's -- and his -- role in revitalizing historical films, Doros adds: "Somehow this really changed our company. We've been able to work on [Kent Mackenzie's]...
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Liz Lemon is No Longer Television's Favorite Workaholic Singleton

The article below contains spoilers for "Mazel Tov, Dummies!," the Thursday, November 29 episode of "30 Rock." Last night on "30 Rock," Liz Lemon (Tina Fey) finally got married, after some six and a half seasons of being unlucky in love and striving to have both a fulfilling relationship and a career even when sometimes neither side of that equation was working out. And like the character herself, whose fierce espousals of progressive, women's lib ideals have tended to run up against a reality that's not so clear cut, the wedding was a poignant, awkward and amusing affair that started with our heroine insisting that marriage was "no big whoop" and "just a piece of paper" and ended with her admitting that maybe she cared after all. It was a nicely handled and sweetly funny way to usher one of TV's most prominent singletons to the altar and allow it to be meaningful without having it seem like an event meant...
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'Searching For Sugar Man,' 'Gatekeepers' Among Producers Guild Doc Award Nominees

The Producers Guild of America (PGA) announced the Documentary Motion Picture nominees for the 24th Annual Producers Guild Awards. The nominated films, listed below in alphabetical order, are: A PEOPLE UNCOUNTED THE GATEKEEPERS THE ISLAND PRESIDENT THE OTHER DREAM TEAM SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN Last year "Beats, Rhymes & Life: The Travels of a Tribe Called Quest," "Bill Cunningham New York," "Project Nim," "Senna" and "The Union" nade up the nominees, with "Beats" winning. Notably, none of those films went on to be nominated for an Oscar. All other nominations for the 2013 Producers Guild Award categories will be announced on January 3, 2013, along with the individual producers. All 2013 Producers Guild Award winners will be announced on January 26, 2013 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel.
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Why Does David Lynch Think Digital Cinema Is "Pretty Beautiful" for Indie Filmmakers?

The mercurial David Lynch, who, sadly, has not made a feature for six years, spoke to The Hollywood Reporter while he was in Poland recently to receive a lifetime achievement award from the Plus Camerimage festival. READ MORE: Our Interview with Keanu Reeves, the No-Kidding Digital Cinema Historian and Filmmaker What Lynch had to say is as confounding as always, but while he does not sound eager to make another film himself he does throw a hopeful light on young writers and directors trying to make a go of indie filmmaking. In response to a question about where he stands on digital cinema, Lynch said this: What it will do is let people express ideas that they love, whereas before they could not afford to express these ideas. Now they can. The problem is, there are no more art houses left, really. There are just blockbuster theaters for the sole purpose of making money. The Internet is the friend of the independent filmmaker now. So it might be harder to find an...
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Watch: New and Final (?) Trailer for Quentin Tarantino's Christmas Western, 'Django Unchained' (Video)

With "Django Unchained" set to open on Christmas Day stateside, the promos for Quentin Tarantino's sure-to-be violent western keep coming. The presumed final domestic trailer recently landed, showcasing some new footage sure to rile up anticipation even further. Set in pre-Civil War America, the Weinstein Company release stars Christoph Waltz as German bounty-hunter Dr. Schultz and Jamie Foxx as a slave named Django. Schultz employs Django to help track down his bounty, the Brittle Brothers, and as a reward promises his freedom and to rescue his enslaved wife (Kerry Washington) from tyrannical plantation proprietor Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio). Watch the new trailer below:
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Watch: Trailer for the New Season of 'Girls' Finds Lena Dunham in Search of Love, Happiness or Maybe Just Awkward Sex (Video)

Lena Dunham's divisive, much-talked about and (by this writer's measure) pretty damn great HBO series "Girls" returns for a second season on Sunday, January 13 at 9pm, followed by the second season premiere of Laura Dern and Mike White's "Enlightened" at 9:30pm. We last left Hannah Horvath (Dunham) eating cake on the beach alone after her friend Jessa's (Jemima Kirke) spontaneous marriage and her own serious fight with boyfriend Adam (Adam Driver). Will Hannah patch things up with her oddball love and finally write the book that marks her as a, if not the, voice of a generation? Will her moving in with her now gay ex Elijah (Andrew Rannells) end in disaster? Will the introduction of Donald Glover provide an adequate response to those who criticized the series for its lack of diversity? Check out the trailer below... and find out.
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Did the AIDS Doc 'How to Survive a Plague' Force Former NYC Mayor Ed Koch to Have a Change of Heart About ACT UP?

When David France was in the middle of production of his film "How to Survive a Plague" (Sundance '12 and an IFC Films/Sundance Selects release), which looks at the AIDS activist group ACT UP from its creation and most robust years through to challenges launched by the Treatment Action Group, he was made aware that former New York City mayor Ed Koch had caught wind of the film. Koch is a particularly interesting character. He was mayor from 1978 to 1989, during the first several years of the AIDS epidemic, and he was the target of many New York AIDS activists' ire. In conversation with Indiewire, France repeated two chants he heard in the footage of ACT UP events that both held Koch accountable for the city's policies and questioned the bachelor's sexuality, which was in question throughout his political career: "C'mon Ed, honey -- spend the money," and "New York AIDS care is ineffectual. Thank Ed Koch, the...
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Que(e)ries: Why Do We Need To Watch The Second Coming of the HIV/AIDS Documentary?

For quite some time I've wanted to start a regular ***-themed column on Indiewire. The precursor to this idea -- at least in large part -- was written at last year's Sundance Film Festival. It was basically a personal essay reflecting on David Weissman's intensely affective documentary "We Were Here" (which had premiered at the festival) in relation to my own experiences with HIV/AIDS and the media. As that essay detailed, I come from a generation of *** men that largely found out about HIV/AIDS through the mainstream media. As a result, I had by my late teens developed a problematic, unnecessary fear of the virus (and a drastic lack of real knowledge regarding it) perpetuated by these largely ignorant media representations. But then I found my way to Gregg Araki's "The Living End," Peter Friedman and Tom Joslin's "Silverlake Life: The View From Here," Derek Jarman's "Blue," Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman's...
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In His Own Words: Marshall Lewy Shares a Scene From 'California Solo' Starring Robert Carlyle

The ever dependable Robert Carlyle, usually relegated to playing a supporting character, gets a chance to show off his leading-man chops in the indie "California Solo," a recent best-narrative-feature winner at the Woostock Film Festival. In the drama from Marshall Lewy ("Blue State"), Carlyle plays Lachlan MacAldonich, a washed-up, middle-aged rocker who is working on an organic farm, mostly with undocumented Mexican workers. One night, Lachlan gets pulled over while driving drunk and a prior drug offense puts him in danger of being deported. In a last-ditch effort, Lachlan must prove that his deportation would cause extreme hardship to a spouse or relative who is a U.S. citizen, forcing him to reach out to his estranged family to get them on his side. Below Lewy shares a scene from the film with Indiewire. Strand Releasing opens "Califonia Solo" Friday, November 30. _______________________________________ "California Solo"...
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Sundance Curiosities: 5 More Observations on the 2013 Lineup, From Found Footage Horror to Transmedia

Editor's note: Sundance Curiosities is a new feature that will run each week between now and the beginning of the Sundance Film Festival and analyze five aspects of the upcoming program. For more details on the latest Sundance announcements, go here. For the last installment of Sundance Curiosities, go here. The Sequel to "VHS": Well, That Was Fast Only a year ago, the anthology found footage horror production "V/H/S" premiered in Sundance's midnight section and surprised nearly everyone for one reason alone: It was really, really good. Anthology movies in general don't tend to generate a lot of buzz, the involvement of filmmaker Joe Swanberg seemed kind of random, while other segment directors like Ti West could have easily phoned it in with unremarkable short work for this ambitious project. Instead, the omnibus effort, produced by Bloody Disgusting, not only presented a fresh take on the found footage gimmick but flowed together...
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Is Netflix Changing the Way TV Series Are Made With Its Use of Data Mining, Or Doing More of the Same Old Thing?

Two weeks ago, Netflix released a trailer for "House of Cards," the David Fincher/Kevin Spacey series that will premiere exclusively on the streaming site on February 1st, marking its first big foray into original programming (following a kind of soft launch with the Norwegian coproduction "Lilyhammer" earlier this year). The company has several new and returning shows in the hopper -- the resurrected "Arrested Development," Eli Roth's "Hemlock Grove" and Jenji Kohan's women-in-prison dramedy "Orange is the New Black" -- but the way in which its approached creating its own programming may be just as interesting as the projects its chosen. Speaking to KCRW back in May, Roth's "Hemlock Grove" collaborator Brian McGreevy compared Netflix's use of data to determine the viewing interests of its 29 million subscribers to "sabermetrics," saying "it's less about the whims of someone at the...
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