October 2012 - Posts

GoDigital Partners With 108 Media on Digital Releases of 'Midnight's Children,' 'My Brother the Devil,' More

GoDigital has partnered with Toronto-based 108 Media to handle digital distribution on all its films. Paladin will still release 108 Media films theatrically and via day-and-date theatrical and VOD in North America, as per the agreement they signed in August. Included in the new agreement are Deepa Mehta's adaptation of the Salman Rushdie novel "Midnight's Children”; Michel Gondry's "The We and The I”; “My Brother The Devil”; “Buffalo Girls”; and "And Now A Word From Our Sponsor." READ MORE: Toronto 2012: Michel Gondry's 'The We and the I' Finds a Home With Paladin and 108 Media “We’re honored to be partnering with 108 Media,” said GoDigital CEO Logan Mulvey. “Coupled with Mark Urman and the Paladin team, they possess a strong vision and impressive history that GoDigital looks forward to collectively expanding on.”
Posted by Indiewire

'V/H/S' Gets a Sequel Greenlit; Gareth Evans and Eduardo Sanchez to Helm Segments

Just in time for Halloween, The Hollywood Reporter revealed in an exclusive that "V/H/S," the anthology found-footage horror film that earned an A from Indiewire's Eric Kohn, is getting a second installment with directors Gareth Evans ("The Raid"), Eduardo Sanchez ("The Blair Witch Project"), Adam Wingard ("You're Next"), Timo Tjahjanto ("Macabre") and Jason Eisener ("Hobo With a Shotgun") all confirmed to helm segments. Simon Barrrett, the writer of Wingard's two features who also penned two segments of "V/H/S," will make his directorial debut in the sequel. While the first movie launched into a series of found-footage stories directed by up-and-coming genre filmmakers (Radio Silence, Adam Wingard, Glenn McQuaid, David Bruckner, Joe Swanberg and Ti West) by following a group of young thugs who break into an abandoned home littered with V/H/S tapes, the Reporter says that the new movie will follow...
Posted by Indiewire

Meet the 2012 AFI FEST Filmmakers #7: 'Starlet' Director Sean Baker

"The A-story of 'Starlet,'" says director Sean Baker, "is inspired by a true event that happened to a friend of my father. A large sum of money was found at a yard sale and my father's friend faced a moral dilemma about whether or not to keep it." In the film, Baker has replaced his father's friend with 21-year-old aspiring actress Jane, who develops an unlikely but revealing relationship with a caustic older woman after a confrontation at a yard sale. How does "Starlet" fit in with your other work? "This is my 4th feature film and the one I am most proud of. It has similarities to the last two films ('Take Out' and 'Prince of Broadway') in tone although stylistically I think it is a departure. What difficulties did you face during production? "Money and time are always the two biggest challenges in making a low-budget film. Never enough money and because of that people end up wearing many hats. And...
Posted by Indiewire

Project of the Day: Before Adam & Eve Was the Myth of Lilith -- 'Go in the Wilderness'

Here's your daily dose of an indie film in progress; at the end of the week, you'll have the chance to vote for your favorite. In the meantime: Is this a movie you’d want to see? Tell us in the comments. "Go in the Wilderness" Tweetable Logline: Adam had a wife before Eve: this is her story. "Go in the Wilderness" reinterprets the myth of Lilith, the real first woman. Elevator Pitch: "Go in the Wilderness" reinterprets the myth of Lilith, Adam’s rebellious first mate. After escaping the Garden of Eden Lilith meets a mysterious guardian bound to return her home. The two set out, neither knowing the way, and forge an uneasy alliance on their journey. Once back in the Garden, they meet Adam and his new mate Eve, and realise that all is not as it seems in Paradise... Shot against the striking backdrop of Quebec’s remote North Coast, "Go in the Wilderness" presents a bold new version of the myth of...
Posted by Indiewire

Martin Campbell Will Direct Hostage Drama 'Coup' for ABC

"Casino Royale" and "Green Lantern" director Martin Campbell actually first made his name in television, helming episode of '80s UK series like "The Professionals" and "Edge of Darkness." Lately it seems like he's been aiming to get back to the small screen, first being brought on to direct Syfy's reboot of the Terry Nation classic sci-fi show "Blake's 7," and now being attached to "Coup," a drama that's just been put in development at ABC. READ MORE: Martin Campbell to Direct a Reboot of British Sci-fi Series 'Blake’s 7' According to Deadline, Campbell will executive produce and direct the project, which is being written by "Mad Men" co-executive producer Chris Black. "Coup" is about an American man who pairs up with a mercenary to get his wife back after she's taken hostage in an overseas coup. Deadline describes "Coup" as a...
Posted by Indiewire

10 Films To Watch at AFI FEST

AFI FEST gets under way November 1st in Hollywood, offering from 28 countries screening over 8 days. That's a lot of options in a short time frame, so Indiewire's staff is offering up ten choices for your consideration, most of them with a significant premiere status at the fest. This isn't to say there isn't plenty of worthwhile films to choose from outside our list, but we figured a helpful nudge or two (or ten) might help make scheduling your own personal AFI FEST a little bit easier: “All the Light in the Sky” (North American Premiere) This Young Americans entry is the latest from super-prolific lo-fi filmmaker Joe Swanberg, who again directed, co-wrote, produced, edited and shot his own film. In a change from his usual milieus, however, “All the Light in the Sky” is a Hollywood story, albeit a very small one. Jane Adams, who co-wrote the 79-minute film, stars with Sophia Takal (a writer-director herself with the 2011 thriller...
Posted by Indiewire

TV Ratings: Winners ("NCIS," "Once Upon a Time") and Losers (The World Series, "Happy Endings")

The 2012-13 television season just finished up its fifth week, and for the first time this season NBC did not lead in the 18-49 demographic, and CBS didn't lead in viewers. Instead, Fox did -- but it was likely a World Series-influenced fluke, and one that could have been more impressive.  More on that, as well as other winners and losers from the week, as Indiewire offers up highlights from the just-in ratings: Winner: Fox After four straight weeks of NBC taking the 18-49 crown (the first time they'd done so in a decade) and CBS finding the most total viewers, Fox -- having a generally dismal season so far -- turned things around in large part due to the World Series. The network won the week in both 18-49 (with a 3.3 rating average) and overall viewers (averaging 10.69 million). But don't expect next week to be the same scenario... Loser: The World Series While it helped Fox become the week's ratings champion, the World Series was hardly an...
Posted by Indiewire

Eli Roth-Approved Canadian Filmmaking Twins Discuss Their Gory Follow-Up to 'Dead Hooker,' 'American Mary'

Not long ago, 29-year-old Canadian twins Jen and Sylvia Soska were just another typically disgruntled pair of film school students struggling to cast and finance their final project. Modeled on the exploitation trailers in Quentin Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez’s “Grindhouse,” the Soskas’ brazenly-titled short “Dead Hooker in a Trunk” was an absurdist, blood-spattered, lo-fi romp that cost the sisters their funding and earned them the disdain of school administrators. Having been expanded to feature length, however, in the wake of a raucous graduation-day screening, “Dead Hooker” was picked up last year by IFC Midnight for On Demand and DVD release, and won an eager following among horror acolytes that included Eli Roth, director of “Hostel” and the “Grindhouse” trailer “Thanksgiving.” The Soskas return this year with their sophomore effort, “American Mary,” the disquieting tale of...
Posted by Indiewire

Provocative Documentary 'The Act of Killing' Grabbed by Drafthouse Films for 2013 Awards Run

Drafthouse Films has acquired U.S. rights to the provocative documentary “The Act Of Killing,” directed by Joshua Oppenheimer. With the crowded late-fall release schedule and an overabundance of strong docs in 2012, Drafthouse plans to hold “Killing” for a 30-market theatrical release in 2013, plus an awards campaign. Using a groundbreaking meta-format, Oppenheimer explores genocide in Indonesia by convincing unrepentant former death-squad leaders to re-enact their brutal murders. “Killing” has played at both the Telluride and Toronto film festivals and has drawn support from Werner Herzog and Errol Morris, now both executive producers of the film. Signe Byrge Sørensen produced for Denmark’s Final Cut for Real. READ MORE: Telluride Review: Harrowing 'Act of Killing' Is the Most Unsettling Movie About Mass Killing Since 'Shoah' “‘The Act Of Killing’ is a landmark acquisition for...
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The Trailer Test: Why the New 'Die Hard' Trailer Is Probably Better Than the Movie and 'Hansel and Gretel' Is Better Than Both

In the process of teasing the bigger picture, a trailer should also tell a story, whether or not that story correlates with the movie in question. For the excessive genre movie with strengths that relate more to movement, violent, attitude and sudden noises rather than pithy tools of the trade like character development, the trailer presents a tricky proposition. In a running time that can often represent roughly one percent the length of the feature, the trailer must sample a lot of physical details. Sometimes, a speedy montage will do the trick. In the case of "A Good Day to Die Hard," the trailer for the fifth installment of the increasingly creaky "Die Hard" franchise released late last week, the challenge results in a series of abrupt cuts with only the illusion of a narrative sustaining them. At a minute-and-a-half, about a minute shorter than the standard trailer length, the trailer wastes no time establishing the world where the movie takes...
Posted by Indiewire

Watch: NYC's Transit Authority Filmmaker Documents Sandy's Disastrous Effects (VIDEO)

New York City's Metropolitan Transportation Authority knows that New Yorkers love to complain about anything -- but perhaps most of all the city's robust 24/7 transportation system. In an effort to counter the negativity, the MTA brought on a full-time filmmaker to document all the work that they do. Now that Sandy has done her damage and the MTA and the city need to start cleaning up, New Yorkers have been understanding and incredibly appreciative of the work their city needs to do in order to rebuild. The MTA's filmmaker, J.P. Chan (who also directed last week's Project of the Day "A Picture of You"), has done his best to document the ravaging effects of this week's storm on the MTA's YouTube channel.  Below is footage Chan assembled from the downtown South Ferry and Whitehall St. Station: More videos from Sandy can be found on the MTA Video Releases page of the MTA website. For those stuck inside or otherwise...
Posted by Indiewire

Meet the 2012 AFI FEST Filmmakers #6: 'Eat Sleep Die' Director Gabriela Pichler

Swedish director Gabriela Pichler describes the protagonist of her film as a "no *** 21-year-old tomboy Muslim immigrant who spends her time looking after her worn-out father, and hanging out with her fellow workers from the vegetable packing plant." Raša Abdulahović, who can pack 12 bags of lettuce in less than five seconds, finds her tough, small-town existence radically changed, Pichler says, when she loses her job and "is forced into a world where bureaucracy rules and ‘confidence coaching’ is deemed necessary." Did you draw on personal experience in making this film? "[I was] brought up in a working class home, worked at the local cookie factory. Got in to Gothenburg film school, and 'Eat Sleep Die' is my first feature film. Mother from Bosnia and father from Austria, born in Sweden." What did you find most challenging about this production? "Making a non sentimental and honest film about working class...
Posted by Indiewire

Why Ben Affleck Passed on Directing 'Homeland' and a Look at the Filmmakers Who Didn't

At the Casting Society of America's annual Artios Awards on Monday night, Ben Affleck told the crowd that he had passed on the chance to direct the pilot episode of "Homeland." Per The Hollywood Reporter, the "Argo" filmmaker and star said he had already agreed to helm the first episode of the Showtime drama when his wife Jennifer Garner was offered a role in a film. It was his turn to stay with their kids, and having to head to North Carolina to shoot the episode would make that impossible, so he dropped out: "I was sure nothing would happen with the show,” said Affleck, getting a laugh from the crowd. “Now I hate the f----g show. I’ve never seen it. I’m going to attach myself to 14 pilots this year. What prompted Affleck to tell the story was Libby Goldstein, who had worked on casting Homeland, reading a really clever poem that told the story of how having Affleck attached to the project brought in great talent....
Posted by Indiewire

The Spoils: To Sell Nicholas Jarecki's 'Arbitrage' to Awards Voters, Backing Richard Gere Is a Smart Investment

One of the pleasant surprises of the 2011 awards season was the box office and critical success of “Margin Call,” newcomer J.C. Chandor’s look at a Wall Street firm crumbling under its own mendacity. Benefiting from a high-profile ensemble cast, a noteworthy release plan and a timely premise, the film scored a surprising Oscar nomination for Chandor’s original screenplay plus a handful of Independent Spirit noms and a win for best first feature. Now comes first-time writer-director Nicholas Jarecki, whose financial thriller “Arbitrage” has been following a similarly stealth course. With a cast that includes Richard Gere, Susan Sarandon, Brit Marling and Tim Roth, the movie builds a moral quandary around Gere's old-style Master of the Universe, who is equal parts duplicity and charm in his professional and personal lives. READ MORE: The Spoils: Why It's Smart for Millennium Entertainment to Push Jack Black's 'Bernie'...
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Watch: Creepy Music Video for Park Chan-Wook's 'Stoker' Features New Footage and Lots of Spiders (VIDEO)

If the recently unveiled trailer for Park Chan-Wook's first foray into English language filmmaking "Stoker" didn't get you stoked (sorry, we couldn't help ourselves), then a new atmospheric music video and crafty international poster, courtesy of Empire, for the anticipated March 1st release should do the trick. Backed by the haunting track "Becomes the Color" by Emily Wells that's said to play over the end credits of the thriller, the promo shows the painstaking pencil-work that went into the creation of the poster (which you can view below), along with new footage not initially showcased in the trailer released by distributor Fox Searchlight. READ MORE: 'Holy Motors' Gets a Dreamy New Poster "Stoker" centers on moody teen India (Mia Wasikowska), who welcomes in an uncle (Matthew Goode) she didn't know existed soon after her father passes away. With her bereaved mother (Nicole Kidman) visibly unstable, India...
Posted by Indiewire
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