December 2011 - Posts

Video of the Day: A Very Twee New Year with JGL and Deschanel

Really, internet? Wasn't 500 Days more than enough Summer for everyone? Do we really need a video of Zooey Deschanel and Joseph Gordon-Levitt singing a cute New Year's Eve duet? This might the most annoying video on the internet. Actually, wait a second. Play it again. Okay. You know what? It's actually really nice.
Posted by Indiewire

The Last Week of 2011 on Indiewire

With 2012 just around the corner, this week saw Indiewire cap off 2011 with pieces that reflected back on a stellar year for indie film. We also found time to bring attention to two fantastic indies that opened this week -- "Pariah" and "A Separation." Below see the week that was on Indiewire. END OF YEAR PICKS Indie Film Industry While Terrence Malick's "The Tree of Life" took the top spot in Indiewire's's recent 2011 poll of over 160 critics, journalists and other tastemakers of the film world, this much smaller grouping of industry folks - from distributors to publiclists to filmmakers themselves - highlighted a number of other movies large and small (but mostly small) from this year's release calendar. The Indiewire Team While Terrence Malick's "The Tree of Life" took the top spot in Indiewire's's recent 2011 poll of over 160 critics, journalists and other tastemakers of the film world,...
Posted by Indiewire

Vote for Project of the Week! "East of Broadway," "Digital Dharma," "Graceland" or "The Joneses"

It's time to vote to vote for the Project of the Week! Go here to vote for this week's Project of the Week. The winning filmmaker will receive a digital distribution consultation from SnagFilms and will become a candidate for Project of the Month. That winner will be awarded with a consultation from the Sundance Institute. The four projects up for the prize: "The Joneses," "Graceland," "Digital Dharma," and "East of Broadway." Voting will end on Tuesday, January 3, at 11AM Eastern.
Posted by Indiewire

From the Electro-Pop of Drive to a Tamil-Language Novelty Song, These Were 2011's Top Moments of Music in Film

As the music industry is busy writing its own obituary, music on film keeps getting better and better. The year's biggest music-on-film hits were not necessarily original tunes (Wagner probably provided the most memorable aural experience at theaters), the soundtracks of "Drive" and "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo" provided new ear candy. The Electro-Pop Mood Music of "Drive" is a Hipster Hit As Ryan Gosling navigated the streets of LA with the greatest of ease, a sexy electronic score pulsed through the screen. The Playlist has a list of the songs that set the mood for Mr. Gosling's sexy cruising. The very Euro indie, which got much praise when it debuted at Cannes and took a home a directing award for Nicolas Winding Refn, got just as much attention for its soundtrack led by Europop with breezy female vocals. Novelty Tamil Song Beats Bollywood at Its Own Game It's tough for the Tamil industry to get attention over the...
Posted by Indiewire

Here's The 30 Top-Grossing Indies of 2011, Led By Woody Allen's 'Midnight in Paris'

Woody Allen's "Midnight in Paris" was the overwhelming winner at the specialty box office this year, topping this chart of 2011's top grossers with $56.3 million. That's over $20 million more than the next film on the chart - the still-climbing "Descendants" (it could surpass that total when Oscar season has come and gone) - and the highest gross ever for a Woody Allen film. While "Paris" is just one of many success stories for Indiewood this year, overall things have taken a slight dive from 2010's big year. While both years saw six films gross over $10 million, 2011 had only 15 $5 million grossers and 24 $3 million grossers. In 2010, those milestones were reached 19 and 31 times, respectively. Also notable was that four of the top five films in 2011 came from the year's first half, whereas last year's list was dominated by year-end releases like "Black Swan" and "The King's Speech." While...
Posted by Indiewire

Indiewire's 40 New Faces of Indie Film in 2011

Every week, we've profiled promising indie newcomers in our Futures column. Some made their mark in front of the camera, others behind it and a few did both. With 2011 coming to a close, we've selected the year's best to present you with our picks for the 40 new faces of indie film. ACTOR: Olly Alexander, "The Dish & the Spoon" On carrying the film along with co-star Greta Gerwig: "I felt terrified. When you have a small part, you can really focus your energy into one or two scenes but when you have to do a whole movie, you have to relax and trust that the director and the script works and you're the vehicle for the movie. In a way, you almost have to relax more than you would normally...I just wanted it to be good." WRITER/DIRECTOR: Richard Ayoade, "Submarine" While Ayoade has made quite an impression on British television (and any American that began watching his recent hit series “The IT Crowd” after...
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Honor Roll 2011: "Another Happy Day" Star Ellen Barkin

And you thought your family was dysfunctional?  Wait till you see the crew Sam Levinson has assembled for "Another Happy Day" in his first outing as writer/director of a feature film.  Levinson - and let's get this out of the way - is the son of filmmaker Barry Levinson.  Ellen Barkin not only stars in and produced "Another Happy Day" - she made her debut some thirty years back in Sam's dad's first feature "Diner." Honor Roll is a daily series for December that will feature new or previously published interviews, profiles and first-persons of some of the year's most notable cinematic voices. Today we're revisiting an interview with Ellen Barkin who gave a career best turn in the Sundance winner "Another Happy Day." An item to make Page Six drool, Barkin - 57 - is also the romantic partner of Levinson fils - 26. At Sundance some wag photographed her with Susan Sarandon and Demi Moore, who, you...
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Congrats to 'The Jacques Bolsey Project,' Our Project of the Week!

Thanks to your votes, the documentary "The Jacques Bolsey Project" won this weekend's Project of the Week contest. Congratulations to director Alyssa Bolsey. The filmmaker will receive a digital distribution consultation from SnagFilms and is now officially a candidate for Project of the Month. That winner will be awarded with a consultation from the Sundance Institute. Here's what the project's about: This documentary is a real life "Hugo" story. In 2004, a film student stumbles upon some boxes that had belonged to her great-grandfather and had been sitting in the basement for decades since his sudden death. She discovers that he was the inventor of the Bolex camera, one of the most iconic cameras of all time. Who was this forgotten man, with hundreds of inventions, three last names and an archive of drawings and plans? A story of a Renaissance man who was trying to shape the world to his vision in a bitter fight against his own...
Posted by Indiewire

From Abel Ferrara to Lynn Shelton, Here Are 11 Great Movies From 2011 Opening In 2012

The problem with virtually every analysis of the year in film is it takes cues not only from the quality of new movies but also from how they interact with the marketplace. Indiewire's year-end poll is no exception, accounting only for films that received U.S. theatrical releases in 2011. However, there are many, many more movies that may have been lucky enough to land distribution after screening at festivals during the year, but have yet to reach audiences beyond that contained environment. A number of them may wind up on top 10 lists a year from now, but they still belong to the collective memory of 2011 for those lucky enough to have seen them already. That provides us with the opportunity to look ahead with a guarantee of quality for some upcoming releases. It's certainly a more precise kind of anticipation than the finger-crossing involved in speculation about the next Batman sequel and other unseen items on the 2012 calendar. Consider these 11 options from...
Posted by Indiewire

Netflix, Piracy and the IRS: The Top 10 Filmmaker Toolkit Articles of 2011

Like the name suggests, Indiewire's Filmmaker Toolkit is a collection intended to help filmmakers fix, tune or hack their way to success. And, as the wide-ranging topics of 2011's most popular Toolkit pieces made clear, there's no such thing as a Swiss army knife. The issues filmmakers faced ranged from social media to piracy to the IRS, with a solid dose of Netflix besides. So here's our final one-through-10: The most popular Filmmaker Toolkit articles on Indiewire this year. The Decline of Indies on Netflix: Were They Amputated With the Long Tail? Who knew those cute litte red envelopes could cause so much trouble? Anthony Kaufman's article looked at Netflix's attitude toward indie film as it evolved from DVD rental service to streaming entertainment juggernaut. While there was evidence to suggest that Netflix's interest in indies was on the downturn, some commenters had sympathy for the company's position. As one wrote, "NOT...
Posted by Indiewire

Honor Roll 2011 | Pedro Almodóvar's New Muse? Elena Anaya On 'The Skin I Live In'

Spanish actress Elena Anaya is in an enviable position. After first working with Pedro Almodóvar 10 years ago in a small role in "Talk to Her," the Spanish filmmaker responsible for creating some of cinema's juiciest female roles asked if she'd like to take the lead in his latest, "The Skin I Live In" (La Piel que Habito). Honor Roll is a daily series for December that will feature new or previously published interviews, profiles and first-persons of some of the year's most notable cinematic voices. Today we're revisiting an interview with "The Skin I Live In" actress Elena Anaya. Not without some resemblance to Almodóvar's most famous muse, Penélope Cruz, Anaya seduces the screen in her Frankenstein-like complexity. In the film, heroine Vera Cruz is molded by Dr. Robert Ledgard, played by another Almodóvar discovery, Antonio Banderas, in his first role with the director since 1991's "Tie...
Posted by Indiewire

2012 Oscar Predictions: Best Director

indieWIRE will provide regular updates of our predictions for the 84th Academy Award nominations through late January, when the nominations are announced. Here's our take on the best director category.  The men (and sadly this race is entirely about men) behind the frontrunners for best picture - "The Artist" director Michel Hazanavicius, "The Descendants" director Alexander Payne and "Hugo" director Martin Scorsese - seem pretty secure, though after that its a tight race between an impressive trio of filmmakers: Steven Spielberg, Woody Allen, Terrence Malick, Bennett Miller and - if the film rallys - Stephen Daldry seem like the only folks with genuine shots at this point. Best director predictions below. Check out all predictions in all the categories here. The Predicted 5: 1. Michel Hazanavicius, The Artist 2. Alexander Payne, The Descendants 3. Martin Scorsese, Hugo 4. Steven Spielberg, War Horse 5. Terrence...
Posted by Indiewire

2012 Oscar Predictions: Best Actress

indieWIRE will provide regular updates of our predictions for the 84th Academy Award nominations through late January, when the nominations are announced. Here's our take on best actress, which is a race that for quite some time seemed assured to consist of three women: Viola Davis ("The Help"), Meryl Streep ("The Iron Lady") and Michelle Williams ("My Week With Marilyn"). And it's a near-certainty one of them will end up winning the award come February. Beyond them, two spots have until recently seemed very much up for grabs. But all of a sudden Tilda Swinton emerged as a strong potential fourth contender after nabbing the holy nomination trinity of SAG, Golden Globe and Critics Choice for her work in "We Need To Talk About Kevin." It would be Swinton's first lead actress nomination after winning a supporting trophy for "Michael Clayton" five years ago. The fifth slot is still a bit shaky, but after being...
Posted by Indiewire

2012 Oscar Predictions: Best Actor

indieWIRE will provide regular updates of our predictions for the 84th Academy Award nominations through late January, when the nominations are announced. Here's our take on best actor, which is a heated, glamorous race that pits some of the biggest movie stars on the planet - Leonardo diCaprio ("J. Edgar"), George Clooney ("The Descendants") and Brad Pitt ("Moneyball") - against a relatively unknown Frenchman (Jean Dujardin for "The Artist") and a quickly rising star and sex symbol himself (Michael Fassbender for "Shame"). Pitt, diCaprio and Clooney (the former two have never won, while the latter has but in the supporting category) seem pretty locked in, as does Dujardin. And any of them could win, with Dujardin perhaps poised to upset Roberto Benigni-style if "The Artist" sweeps the night. As for Fassbender, "Shame"'s dark content and NC-17 rating could hurt him. He didn't get a SAG...
Posted by Indiewire

2012 Oscar Predictions: Best Supporting Actress

The indieWIRE will provide regular updates of our predictions for the 84th Academy Award nominations through late January, when the nominations are announced. Here's our take on best supporting actress, which SAG and the Golden Globes have quickly narrowed down to a race between seven or eight women. Sitting on the outside are Carey Mulligan ("Shame") and Vanessa Redgrave ("Corionalus"), both of whom failed to get a mention from the major precursors. But the British voters in the Academy could help them join the ranks of the following six women: Octavia Spencer ("The Help"), Berenice Bejo ("The Artist"), Jessica Chastain ("The Help"), Janet McTeer ("Albert Nobbs"), Shailene Woodley ("The Descendants") and Melissa McCarthy ("Bridesmaids"). At this point it seems like 5 of them will make up the eventual shortlist, with Spencer and Bejo the only real locks. There's definitely room for...
Posted by Indiewire
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