Blogs

  • Hamm, Radcliffe finalized for 'Young Doctors' mini

    TV News: Thesps will play same character in British show
    Posted to The Business of Television by Variety - TV News on Thu, May 17 2012
  • 'Kimmel Live' scores ratings milestone

    TV News: ABC show tops 'Tonight' on a night for first time
    Posted to The Business of Television by Variety - TV News on Thu, May 17 2012
  • CANNES REVIEW: Jacques Audiard Gets Sentimental With Bittersweet Marion Cotillard Vehicle 'Rust and Bone'

    French director Jacques Audiard tends to explore the conflicts of grave, conflicted men stuck between an instinctual need to overcome basic obstacles and assume greater responsibilities for the world around them. A mere glance at the one-sheets from Audiard's filmography reveals a collection of scowling male faces. The filmmaker achieved the apotheosis of this focus with 2009's "A Prophet," in which a lower-class criminal finds his catharsis in religious transcendence. "Rust and Bone," Audiard's latest effort, never reaches those same heights, although it concerns the same fundamental trajectory. Satisfying for what it is, the movie merely confirms Audiard's skill with engaging actors in the potent theme of retribution. Although it takes time getting to the point, "Rust and Bone" is essentially a romance between two troubled souls. Ali (Matthias Schoenaerts), a muscular bouncer who moonlights as a street fighter, shows up in the...
    Posted to Indieville by Indiewire on Thu, May 17 2012
  • Out This Week: 13 Reviews of New Indie Releases

    Capsule Options is a new weekly column intended to provide reviews of nearly every new indie release. REVIEWS THIS WEEK "American Animal" "Beyond the Black Rainbow" "The Color Wheel" "Elena" "Follow Me: The Yoni Netanyahu Story" "Hysteria" "Lovely Molly" "Mansome" "Never Stand Still" "One Hundred Years of Evil" "Poliss" "The Samaritan" "The Yankles" "American Animal" “American Animal” begins with bombastic fanfare and a cursive-script title card that announces its arrival, establishing a relentless vibe that persists for much of its 95-minute running time. At its heart are two roommates, Jimmy and James, living in a spacious loft and subsiding off the wealth of unseen parents. Jimmy’s drug-induced morning routine is dished out amongst a sea of jump cuts against a...
    Posted to Indieville by Indiewire on Thu, May 17 2012
  • USA casts broad development net

    TV News: Cabler's slate includes 6 dramas, 4 comedies and 3 reality skeins
    Posted to The Business of Television by Variety - TV News on Thu, May 17 2012
  • News Corp. ups stake in Saudi conglom

    TV News: Saudi Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal has been key Murdoch ally
    Posted to The Business of Television by Variety - TV News on Thu, May 17 2012
  • 'Idol,' 'Criminal Minds' up on Wednesday

    TV News: Fox rolls as 'Modern Family,' other ABC shows drop
    Posted to The Business of Television by Variety - TV News on Thu, May 17 2012
  • CANNES Q&A: 'The We & the I' Director Michel Gondry On Improvised Performances and How He Came to Appreciate Cannes

    Michel Gondry isn't known for taking on obvious, familiar material. But even by those standards, his latest movie, "The We & the I," sounds like something entirely different: a freely improvised story about a group of public school students shot over the course of one day on a school bus. While it opens Directors' Fortnight at Cannes Thursday night, Gondry has already launched another project, an adaptation of "Mood Indigo" starring Audrey Tatou that is currently filming in Paris. The director took a quick break from shooting to talk to Indiewire about the pleasant surprises of working with non-actors, his animated Noam Chomsky film and how he's come a long way from his first Cannes, when he was denied entrance to his own film's party. "The We & the I" stars a group of black teenagers in the Bronx. What drew you to the setting? Usually, these stories involve crime, drugs… they're very dark in general. It...
    Posted to Indieville by Indiewire on Thu, May 17 2012
  • CANNES: Atom Egoyan's West Memphis Three Drama 'Devil's Knot' Gets Financed, via Worldview Entertainment

    Atom Egoyan's West Memphis Three project “Devil’s Knot” will be financed and produced by Worldview Entertainment. Reese Witherspoon and Colin Firth star in the film, which begins shooting next month in Georgia. Elizabeth Fowler, Clark Peterson, Richard Saperstein and Worldview CEO Christopher Woodrow are producing. Worldview’s Molly Conners, Sarah Johnson Redlich, Maria Cestone and Hoyt David Morgan are executive producers along with West Memphis Three defendants Jessie Misskelley Jr. and Jason Baldwin. “Worldview is excited to be involved with such an important and relevant project,” said Woodrow. “We believe this story needs to be told on screen and we couldn’t ask for a higher caliber of talent to do so.” Based on Mara Leveritt’s 2002 book, “Devil’s Knot” was adapted by Paul Harris Boardman and Scott Derrickson. The Weinstein Company is handling international sales on the project in...
    Posted to Indieville by Indiewire on Thu, May 17 2012
  • Channel 5 nabs 'Person of Interest'

    TV News: Thriller exec produced by J.J. Abrams
    Posted to The Business of Television by Variety - TV News on Thu, May 17 2012
  • CANNES REVIEW: 'After the Battle' Brings an Activist Romance to Tahrir Square

    Now that a number of documentaries have dealt with the 2011 Egyptian uprising at Cairo's Tahrir Square -- most prominently, the scrappy "1/2 Revolution" and broadly focused "Tahrir" -- it comes as no surprise that the events have been applied to a fictional scenario, and by no less than a prominent Egyptian filmmaker, Yousry Nasrallah ("Gate of Sun"). Ably using the turmoil at Tahrir as his backdrop, Nasrallah's "After the Battle" follows a burgeoning, ill-fated romance between two characters uniquely impacted by social upheaval. The director's use of existing events to form the movie's backbone led one colleague to compare it to Haskell Wexler's "Medium Cool," which took place at the 1968 Democratic National Convention, but the precedent applies in theory alone. Despite its admirable intentions, "After the Battle" constantly fights an uphill battle to reach its potential and never quite gets...
    Posted to Indieville by Indiewire on Thu, May 17 2012
  • Fisher Stevens to Direct Adaptation of Philip Roth's 'American Pastoral'

    Philip Roth’s Pulitzer Prize-winning 1997 novel “American Pastoral” will be turned into a film by screenwriter John Romano (“The Lincoln Lawyer”) and director Fisher Stevens. Lakeshore Entertainment, which produced adaptations of Roth’s “The Human Stain” and “The Dying Animal,” is producing the project with Sidney Kimmel Entertainment, with filming set to begin early in 2013. In “Pastoral,” Roth’s alter ego Nathan Zuckerman narrates the story of Seymour “Swede” Levov, whose great post-war life is thrown into disarray when his teenaged daughter commits an act of political terrorism during the Vietnam War protests of 1968. The book is the first novel in a trilogy that includes “The Human Stain.” Lakeshore’s Tom Rosenberg and Gary Lucchesi are producing with Sidney Kimmel. SKE execs Jim Tauber and Matt Berenson are executive producers. “Philip Roth is...
    Posted to Indieville by Indiewire on Thu, May 17 2012
  • CW to bow fall sked in October

    TV News: Net holds 'Carrie,' 'Cult' for midseason
    Posted to The Business of Television by Variety - TV News on Thu, May 17 2012
  • Finding darkness at comedy's core

    TV News: Billion-Dollar Composer: Steve Jablonsky
    Posted to The Business of Television by Variety - TV News on Wed, May 16 2012
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